Theis Ivan Sølling

New equipment helps reveal the pore systems in the North Sea

Thursday 07 Dec 17
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From Qatar to Lyngby. The micro- and nano-CT scanners from Maersk Oil Qatar have been set up in the basement of Danish Hydrocarbon Research and Technology Centre ready to unravel the secrets of the pore system in North Sea Chalk. 

It has been hard work for Theis Ivan Sølling, professor at Copenhagen University, and his team to install the new micro- and nano-CT scanners in the basement of Danish Hydrocarbon Research and Technology Centre (DHRTC) in Lyngby. However, now the scanners are set up and the x-rays shine for the first time in the basement of 375 - ready to help researchers reveal the nature of pore systems and flow regimes.

"The scanners provide data to make it possible to calculate petrophysical parameters such as porosity and permeability."
Theis Ivan Sølling

 

With the new set-up it will be possible to observe flow patterns much closer to the pore scale.  This will prove valuable in studies that focus on obtaining correlations between for example depositional environment and pore characteristics.

 

Rock-imaging techniques and subsequent image-based modeling of petrophysical parameters have undergone a tremendous development in recent years with the advent of readily available laboratory-based CT scanners with micrometer resolution1.

 

Theis Ivan Sølling says that “The scanners provide data to make it possible to calculate petrophysical parameters such as porosity and permeability.  The data can even be employed in mimicking multiphase flow such as that of water and brine”.

 

Previously, Theis worked for Maersk Oil Qatar as Team Lead for Digital Core Lab.  Although the Qatari subsurface consists of skeletal limestone – a carbonate which has quite a different geological context compared to that of the North Sea chalk the research focus remains very similar.

 

Limestone mostly has an oily surface while the chalk is mostly covered by water molecules. The difference has been proposed to arise from the depositional environment that gave rise to a layer of polysaccharides on the chalk, which then binds water to the rock.

 

“I hope to tie the depositional environment to the actual nature of the surface coverage and figure out the exact molecular reason for the difference between the surface properties of limestone and chalk.  Not only is it an important question in its own right it is also key in methods for producing more oil” Theis ends looking at the scanners. 

 

Theis Ivan Sølling in the middle of setting up the scanners.

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http://www.oilgas.dtu.dk/english/press/nyhedsbase/nyhed?id=F1D2A41D-F51A-4895-86A7-3531332C9EE1
17 DECEMBER 2017